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Goodloe v. State

Supreme Court of Minnesota

December 26, 2019

Leonard Goodloe, Appellant,
v.
State of Minnesota, Respondent.

          Hennepin County Office of Appellate Courts

          Leonard Goodloe, Bayport, Minnesota, pro se.

          Keith Ellison, Attorney General, Saint Paul, Minnesota; and Michael O. Freeman, Hennepin County Attorney, Jonathan P. Schmidt, Assistant County Attorney, Minneapolis, Minnesota, for respondent.

         SYLLABUS

         The district court did not abuse its discretion in summarily denying appellant's third petition for postconviction relief because, even when the alleged facts are viewed in a light most favorable to appellant, he is conclusively entitled to no relief.

         Affirmed.

         Considered and decided by the court without oral argument.

          OPINION

          McKEIG, JUSTICE

         A Hennepin County jury found appellant Leonard Goodloe guilty of first-degree premeditated murder, Minn. Stat. § 609.185(a)(1) (2018), and he was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of release. On direct appeal, Goodloe argued that the district court committed plain error when it gave the pattern jury instruction on premeditation. We affirmed Goodloe's conviction, concluding that the jury instruction accurately stated the law. Twelve years later, in November 2018, Goodloe filed his third petition for postconviction relief, arguing that the district court's instruction on premeditation did not accurately state the law. The district court summarily denied the petition. Because Goodloe is conclusively entitled to no relief, even when the alleged facts are viewed in a light most favorable to him, we affirm.

         FACTS

         On July 22, 2004, Akeen Brown was fatally shot in the back office of a convenience store.[1] Following a police investigation, a grand jury indicted appellant Leonard Goodloe for first-degree premeditated murder. Goodloe pleaded not guilty.

         At trial, the State presented evidence that established the following facts. On July 22, 2004, Brown was standing in front of a convenience store when Goodloe stepped out of a car and waved a gun. Brown fled into the convenience store and hid in the office. A few seconds later, Goodloe entered the store and asked something to the effect of "where he at, where he at." He then forced open the office door and shot Brown in the head three times with a .357 caliber handgun.

         Without objection, the district court provided the jurors the pattern jury instruction regarding the element of premeditation.[2] See 10 Minn. Dist. Judges Ass'n, Minnesota Practice-Jury Instruction Guides, Criminal, CRIMJIG 11.02 (4th ed. 1999). At the time of Goodloe's trial, CRIMJIG 11.02 stated in relevant part that "[i]t is not necessary that premeditation exist for any specific length of time." The jury found Goodloe guilty as charged, and the district court imposed a sentence of life without the possibility of release.

         On direct appeal, Goodloe argued that "the jury instruction on premeditation constituted plain error affecting his substantial rights." State v. Goodloe, 781 N.W.2d 413, 420 (Minn. 2006). According to Goodloe, CRIMJIG 11.02 did not accurately incorporate our holding in State v. Moore, 481 N.W.2d 355, 361 (Minn. 1992), that "some appreciable time" must pass after forming an intent to kill. Concluding ...


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